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Program of Learning

English

Listening and Speaking

Phase 1 (Early Years Nursery and Pre-K)

Learners show an understanding of the value of speaking and listening to communicate. They recognise that sounds are associated with objects, or with symbolic representations of them. They are using language to name their environment, to get to know each other, to initiate and explore relationships, to question and inquire.

Phase 2 (Kindergarten)

Learners show an understanding that sounds are associated with objects, events and ideas, or with symbolic representations of them. They are aware that an object or symbol may have different sounds or words associated with it in different languages. They are beginning to be cognisant about the high degree of variability of language and its uses.

Phase 3 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners show an understanding of the wide range of purposes of spoken language: that it instructs, informs, entertains, reassures; that each listener’s perception of what they hear is unique. They are compiling rules about the use of different aspects of language.

Phase 4 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners show an understanding of the conventions associated with speaking and listening and the value of adhering to those conventions. They are aware that language is a vehicle for becoming knowledgeable; for negotiating understanding; and for negotiating the social dimension.

Phase 5 (Grade 5)

Learners are able to understand the difference between literal and figurative language; how to use language differently for different purposes. They are aware that they are building on their previous experiences and using language to construct new meaning

Viewing and Presenting

Phase 1 (Early Years Nursery and Pre-K)

Learners show an understanding that the world around them is full of visual language that conveys meaning. They are able to interpret and respond to visual texts. Although much of their own visual language is spontaneous, they are extending and using visual language in more purposeful ways.

Phase 2 (Kindergarten)

Learners identify, interpret and respond to a range of visual text prompts and show an understanding that different types of visual texts serve different purposes. They use this knowledge to create their own visual texts for particular purposes.

Phase 3 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners show an understanding that visual text may represent reality or fantasy. They recognise that visual text resources can provide factual information and increase understanding. They use visual text in a reflective way to enrich their storytelling or presentations, and organise and represent information.

Phase 4 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners show an open-mindedness about the use of a range of visual text resources to access information. They think critically, and are articulate about the use of visual text to influence the viewer. They are able to use visual imagery to present factual information, or to tell a story.

Phase 5 (Grade 5)

Through inquiry, learners engage with an increasing range of visual text resources. As well as exploring the viewing and presenting strategies that are a part of the planned learning environment, they select and use strategies that suit their learning styles. They are able to make connections between visual imagery and social commentary. They show more discernment in selecting information they consider reliable. They are able to use visual imagery to support a position.

Reading

Phase 1 (Early Years Nursery and Pre-K)

Learners show an understanding that print represents the real or the imagined world. They know that reading gives them knowledge and pleasure; that it can be a social activity or an individual activity. They have a concept of a “book”, and an awareness of some of its structural elements. They use visual cues to recall sounds and the words they are “reading” to construct meaning.

Phase 2 (Kindergarten)

Learners show an understanding that language can be represented visually through codes and symbols. They are extending their data bank of printed codes and symbols and are able to recognise them in new contexts. They understand that reading is a vehicle for learning, and that the combination of codes conveys meaning.

Phase 3 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners show an understanding that text is used to convey meaning in different ways and for different purposes—they are developing an awareness of context. They use strategies, based on what they know, to read for understanding. They recognise that the structure and organisation of text conveys meaning.

Phase 4 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners show an understanding of the relationship between reading, thinking and reflection. They know that reading is extending their world, both real and imagined, and that there is a reciprocal relationship between the two. Most importantly, they have established reading routines and relish the process of reading.

Phase 5 (Grade 5)

Learners show an understanding of the strategies authors use to engage them. They have their favourite authors and can articulate reasons for their choices. Reading provides a sense of accomplishment, not only in the process, but in the access it provides them to further knowledge about, and understanding of, the world.

Writing

Phase 1 (Early Years Nursery and Pre-K)

Learners show an understanding that writing is a form of expression to be enjoyed. They know that how you write and what you write conveys meaning; that writing is a purposeful act, with both individual and collaborative aspects.

Phase 2 (Kindergarten)

Learners show an understanding that writing is a means of recording, remembering and communicating. They know that writing involves the use of codes and symbols to convey meaning to others; that writing and reading uses the same codes and symbols. They know that writing can describe the factual or the imagined world.

Phase 3 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners show an understanding that writing can be structured in different ways to express different purposes. They use imagery in their stories to enhance the meaning and to make it more enjoyable to write and read. They understand that writing can produce a variety of responses from readers. They can tell a story and create characters in their writing.

Phase 4 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners show an understanding of the role of the author and are able to take on the responsibilities of authorship. They demonstrate an understanding of story structure and are able to make critical judgments about their writing, and the writing of others. They are able to rewrite to improve the quality of their writing.

Phase 5 (Grade 5)

Learners show an understanding of the conventions pertaining to writing, in its different forms, that are widely accepted. In addition, they demonstrate a high level of integration of the strands of language in order to create meaning in a manner that suits their learning styles. They can analyse the writing of others and identify common or recurring themes or issues. They accept feedback from others.

Mathematics

Data Handling

Phase 1 (Early Years and Kindergarten)

Learners will develop an understanding of how the collection and organisation of information helps to make sense of the world. They will sort, describe and label objects by attributes and represent information in graphs including pictographs and tally marks. The learners will discuss chance in daily events.

Phase 2 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners will understand how information can be expressed as organised and structured data and that this can occur in a range of ways. They will collect and represent data in different types of graphs, interpreting the resulting information for the purpose of answering questions. The learners will develop an understanding that some events in daily life are more likely to happen than others and they will identify and describe likelihood using appropriate vocabulary.

Phase 3 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners will continue to collect, organise, display and analyse data, developing an understanding of how different graphs highlight different aspects of data more efficiently. They will understand that scale can represent different quantities in graphs and that mode can be used to summarise a set of data. The learners will make the connection that probability is based on experimental events and can be expressed numerically.

Phase 4 (Grade 5)

Learners will collect, organise and display data for the purposes of valid interpretation and communication. They will be able to use the mode, median, mean and range to summarise a set of data. They will create and manipulate an electronic database for their own purposes, including setting up spreadsheets and using simple formulas to create graphs. Learners will understand that probability can be expressed on a scale (0–1 or 0%–100%) and that the probability of an event can be predicted theoretically.

Shape, Space and Geometry

Phase 1 (Early Years and Kindergarten)

Learners will understand that shapes have characteristics that can be described and compared. They will understand and use common language to describe paths, regions and boundaries of their immediate environment.

Phase 2 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners will continue to work with 2D and 3D shapes, developing the understanding that shapes are classified and named according to their properties. They will understand that examples of symmetry and transformations can be found in their immediate environment. Learners will interpret, create and use simple directions and specific vocabulary to describe paths, regions, positions and boundaries of their immediate environment.

Phase 3 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners will sort, describe and model regular and irregular polygons, developing an understanding of their properties. They will be able to describe and model congruency and similarity in 2D shapes. Learners will continue to develop their understanding of symmetry, in particular reflective and rotational symmetry. They will understand how geometric shapes and associated vocabulary are useful for representing and describing objects and events in real-world situations.

Phase 4 (Grade 5)

Learners will understand the properties of regular and irregular polyhedra. They will understand the properties of 2D shapes and understand that 2D representations of 3D objects can be used to visualise and solve problems in the real world, for example, through the use of drawing and modelling. Learners will develop their understanding of the use of scale (ratio) to enlarge and reduce shapes. They will apply the language and notation of bearing to describe direction and position.

Patterns, Function and Algebra

Phase 1 (Early Years and Kindergarten)

Learners will understand that patterns and sequences occur in everyday situations. They will be able to identify, describe, extend and create patterns in various ways.

Phase 2 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners will understand that whole numbers exhibit patterns and relationships that can be observed and described, and that the patterns can be represented using numbers and other symbols. As a result, learners will understand the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction, and the associative and commutative properties of addition. They will be able to use their understanding of pattern to represent and make sense of real-life situations and, where appropriate, to solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

Phase 3 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners will analyse patterns and identify rules for patterns, developing the understanding that functions describe the relationship or rules that uniquely associate members of one set with members of another set. They will understand the inverse relationship between multiplication and division, and the associative and commutative properties of multiplication. They will be able to use their understanding of pattern and function to represent and make sense of real-life situations and, where appropriate, to solve problems involving the four operations.

Phase 4 (Grade 5)

Learners will understand that patterns can be represented, analysed and generalised using algebraic expressions, equations or functions. They will use words, tables, graphs and, where possible, symbolic rules to analyse and represent patterns. They will develop an understanding of exponential notation as a way to express repeated products, and of the inverse relationship that exists between exponents and roots. The students will continue to use their understanding of pattern and function to represent and make sense of real-life situations and to solve problems involving the four operations.

Number

Phase 1 (Early Years and Kindergarten)

Learners will understand that numbers are used for many different purposes in the real world. They will develop an understanding of one-to-one correspondence and conservation of number, and be able to count and use number words and numerals to represent quantities.

Phase 2 (Grades 1 and 2)

Learners will develop their understanding of the base 10 place value system and will model, read, write, estimate, compare and order numbers to hundreds or beyond. They will have automatic recall of addition and subtraction facts and be able to model addition and subtraction of whole numbers using the appropriate mathematical language to describe their mental and written strategies. Learners will have an understanding of fractions as representations of whole-part relationships and will be able to model fractions and use fraction names in real-life situations.

Phase 3 (Grades 3 and 4)

Learners will develop the understanding that fractions and decimals are ways of representing whole-part relationships and will demonstrate this understanding by modelling equivalent fractions and decimal fractions to hundredths or beyond. They will be able to model, read, write, compare and order fractions, and use them in real-life situations. Learners will have automatic recall of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts. They will select, use and describe a range of strategies to solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, using estimation strategies to check the reasonableness of their answers.

Phase 4 (Grade 5)

Learners will understand that the base 10 place value system extends infinitely in two directions and will be able to model, compare, read, write and order numbers to millions or beyond, as well as model integers. They will develop an understanding of ratios. They will understand that fractions, decimals and percentages are ways of representing whole-part relationships and will work towards modelling, comparing, reading, writing, ordering and converting fractions, decimals and percentages. They will use mental and written strategies to solve problems involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals in real-life situations, using a range of strategies to evaluate reasonableness of answers.

Music


Starting in 2011 with 20 students and one choir lesson per week, the music program at Carmel now has two choirs with 60 children in each, a dance troupe, and a peripatetic instrumental program from K-3.

Our unique music program ensures that all students, regardless of their age, are able to participate, and we encourage students to develop a love of and appreciation for music that will last them a lifetime.

At Carmel Elementary, students have the opportunity to take part in:

  • Weekly instrumental lessons by private tutors
  • Choir performances
  • Inter House Music competitions
  • Instrumental showcase concerts
  • Music ensembles
  • Dance performances
  • Creative soirees
  • External instrumental examinations

Early years

Students participate in a variety of musical activities to develop skills in beat and rhythm, pitch and melody. Students learn songs with simple melodic and rhythmic patterns and basic elements of vocal technique. Students also explore body percussion, tempo, form and dynamics, creating and performing using instruments, voice, movement and visual notation.

Higher grades

Students are encouraged to learn an instrument at school, either individually or in small groups and to join a music ensemble. Students commence their study of music theory and learn to read music notation, key musical elements and terminology. Students also have exposure to the different types of electronic music and explore music ideas through the creation and performance of melodic and rhythmic patterns using instruments, movement and voice.

Physical Education

For a full breakdown of the PE program of learning from Pre-K to Grade 5, please see this document.

English as an Additional Language (EAL)

Carmel School has created the instructional program, English as an Additional Language (EAL), to meet the needs of non-native English speakers. The purpose of the EAL Program is to support students whose dominant language is not English until they demonstrate a functional ability to understand, speak, read and write in English, and therefore meet the academic standards required by the school.

Eligibility

1. Students new to Hong Kong from a non-English speaking country are automatically enrolled in the EAL program.

2. Students new to Hong Kong whose dominant family language is not English are automatically enrolled in the EAL program.

3. All other students for whom English is not their dominant home language, or whose homes are multi-lingual shall be considered.

Enrollment and frequency of services are determined by the EAL teacher, in conjunction with classroom teachers, principal and parent input.

Aims

1. To assist beginners of English become used to their new school and environment.

2. To help them function in class, and in school as a whole, as quickly and as happily as possible.

3. The aim with more advanced students is to refine and polish their English skills to give them a level of competency and confidence in using English that allows them to participate fully in the school- wide curriculum.

Time

EAL classes take place between one and three times a week, depending on level and ability of the student. Each session is one class period at a time. The EAL teacher and classroom teachers will liaise in order to determine the frequency of EAL services necessary for each student, and these can change over the course of the year depending on progress.

The timetable is planned so that EAL sessions take place during the most appropriate time for them. Usually, it’s a Literacy or Library period when the student will miss the least amount of classroom learning time.

Time Scale for EAL Attendance

  • Children remain in the EAL program until they can function in the regular classroom at an average level.
  • Non-native speakers at entry to the program will be required to attend for two years minimum.
  • EAL support is often required for longer than two years; the number of sessions and manner of instruction is adapted according to individual needs

Progress

  • EAL assessments are conducted regularly.
  • General progress reports are sent home at the end of every regular school semester.
  • Parent conferences take place twice a year.
  • When an EAL student is receiving TLC or other specialist services, an IEP will be established. Regular Team Meetings will take place to discuss overall progress.

Types

Pull-out: The pull-out model is typically used students who are non-English proficient. Students spend the school day in the core classroom, but are be pulled out to receive instruction in English as a second language.

Collaborative or Push-in: In the collaborative model the EAL teacher is pulled into the core classroom where he/she provides support and instruction to individuals and small groups.

Class nos.

The number of students in an EAL class is small. Some groups may have as few as two children. Generally up to five is the maximum number in a class. Students are placed with other children who have similar abilities.

Content

The EAL program is divided into four areas of focus: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

The program is tailor-made for each student according to his or her ability to learn, and how much English he or she already knows. Students commence work on basic needs and conversation skills immediately. Reading, fluency, spelling, and an understanding of spoken English are all part of the EAL curriculum.

Parents

  • The EAL teacher maintains contact with parents throughout the year.
  • Parents will receive additional comments on their report card from the EAL teacher on their report cards outlining the nature of their EAL work and their progress made.
  • The EAL teacher will be available for meetings with all EAL families in order to discuss specific details observations and progress of their child.
  • Carmel School events take precedent over EAL sessions. Every attempt will be made to make up the lessons missed, but regretfully this cannot always be possible given the schedule.

The Learning Connection (TLC)

Zenith

Students who have received a diagnosis from an educational psychologist or medical doctor, as specified on an educational evaluation, will be the first students considered for TLC Services. Within professional conversation, these students shall be referred to as Zenith Students. Zenith Students shall be provided with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). This plan will outline any academic or social/emotional goals, as well as the accommodations and modifications necessary to achieve these goals. These students’ profiles will be presented by the learning support teacher, to their classroom teachers, at the beginning of each academic year. Zenith students may receive TLC support through push-in or pull-out sessions. The classroom time that students miss during pullout time will be aligned to the support that they are receiving. For example, a student who needs literacy support, should only miss literacy time in the classroom.

TLC

Students who are not a part of the Zenith program, but whose academic and social skills are below grade-level expectations, can also receive services from the learning support teacher at Carmel School. These students shall be referred to as TLC. Students. These services may be receive through push-in or pull-out sessions. The classroom teacher can refer students to the learning support teacher by filling-out two necessary forms entitled: Internal Behaviour Checklist and TLC Referral Form, as well as initiating conversation at monthly Team Meetings. Students who are a part of the TLC program may also be provided with an Accommodations and Modifications Checklist. This checklist will reflect any necessary classroom and curricular adjustments to be made by the classroom teacher.

TLC Overview

The nature of the TLC services will be to provide academic or social skills support in a 1:1 or 2:1 setting. These services can occur between one and three times per week during fixed 40-minute sessions. For billing purposes, they shall be referred to as tracks one, two, and three respectively. Each session is charged according to the prices outlined by Carmel School Association Ltd.

  • A student on track one receives services one time per week
  • A student on track two receives services two times per week
  • A student on track three receives services three times per week

The learning support teacher and classroom teachers will liaise in order to determine the frequency of services necessary for each student. The frequency of services can change over the course of the school year and is dependent on the needs of the student.

TLC Parents

  • Students who receive TLC services on tracks one, two and three will either have extended parent-teacher conferences with the learning support teacher present, or a separate meeting with the learning support teacher.
  • Parents will receive additional comments from the learning support teacher on their child’s report cards outlining the nature of their TLC work, goals set, and progress made.
  • The learning support teacher will be available for meetings with all TLC families throughout the year in order to share observations and progress.
  • The learning support teacher and classroom teacher will work in close collaboration in order to carry-over goals for each child.
  • Carmel School events and celebrations take precedent over TLC sessions. We will always do our best to offer a make-up session, but we regret that this may not always be possible given the schedule.

Additional TLC

The learning support teacher may also pullout, or push-in to the classrooms in order to support small groups of children in each grade. The goal of this support is to help facilitate classroom activities. The students who receive support in this way shall not be billed for these services. For example, a Read, Write, Inc. group that works with the learning support teacher shall not be billed. This level of support is at the discretion of the school and does not require parental notification before commencement.

External Providers

1. Speech and Language: small group and 1:1 sessions are available at Carmel School with licensed Speech and Language Therapist Sam Pygall. These sessions are billed by the therapist and are scheduled by the classroom teacher and therapist.

2. Occupational Therapy: Small group sessions run by a licensed Occupational Therapist are offered once a week as an After School Activity, ‘Funky Fingers.’ Students are grouped by age-level.

3. Social and Emotional Services: private sessions can be scheduled at Carmel with a licensed child psychologist, Anu Mather. These sessions are billed by the therapist and are arranged by the classroom teacher and therapist. These sessions can occur regularly or on an ‘as-need’ basis.

4. Educational Assessments: Carmel School has a working relationship with a few highly regarded educational psychologists in Hong Kong. We will provide their details and information to families as necessary.
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